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Each healthcare organization has its own internal policies related to how data is managed. There are also federal guidelines and regulations regarding the use of patient data. The data harvested by healthcare organizations is no longer uniquely derived from HIT systems. Wearable technologies have emerged in the market. Mega companies like Apple and Samsung, have also teamed up with some telehealth platforms to connect doctors, institutions, and insurance companies.

Evaluate the impact of data derived from wearable technology on healthcare technology.

Include the following aspects in the discussion:

  • Select Apple’s Health Kit or      another consumer platform of your choice.
  • Discuss how the consumer wearable market is changing the      healthcare delivery process.
  • Summarize why cybersecurity continues to be a major obstacle      to consumer wearable adoption specifically in the H.I.T. space.
  • Discuss your personal perspective on how the lack of ethnic      diversity in data collection impacts the future of healthcare research.

REPLY TO 2 OF MY CLASSMATES DISCUSSION TO THE ABOVE QUESTIONS AND EXPLAIN WHY YOU AGREE. MINIMUM OF 150 WORDS EACH

                                              CLASSMATE POST 1

The Apple Health Kit and the many other wearable device technology is creating data in a bountiful way. What the Health Kit does is collect the relevant data and process it specifically for the person wearing the device. The device monitors things such as blood pressure, heart rate, calories burned in a day etc. and that data can be directly sent to your doctor as well. The wearable market is impacting healthcare in that it is making it more accessible, and your data is becoming more personable. If something is on you every day it will learn your habits, your sleep patterns, your calories burned each day and be able to tell you where improvements could be made and commend a healthy change. According to the International Journal of Recent Research Aspects the number of connected medical devices is expected to increase from 10 billion to 50 billion over the next decade (Chawala, 2020). With an increased number of connected devices, it also increases the likelihood of someone accessing private information that is not a health care team member. Cyber security is becoming as important as homeland security as most attackers can do the same damage anonymously and behind a computer screen. The problem with wearable devices is that they are connected mainly via Bluetooth which is a public network were others could see the device connected. Secondly, the data that is being sent or monitored could be interfered while in transmission or an apple watch or device could be stolen that has all the owner’s information freely on it. Despite the tracking and privacy networks they have installed, it is easily overcome or stolen off a wrist. 

The ethical concerns in the lack of diversity in data entry is interesting. It is hard to be able to identify the research subjects or whom you received the data from, however it is important to identify the diversity of a research group to have accurate results for the general population. This is where privacy versus confidentiality becomes an issue. Privacy versus confidentiality is defined as a person’s information such as name, insurance, and other confidential information being released through the informed release, which can cause harm such as discrimination and social stigma (Hebda, 2019). I personally think there should be a diverse representation in data entry as every population offers something different that the general population could benefit from. Adding diversity also helps gain information at predisposition a population could face and how it can be treated or avoided early on. 

 
 

References

  • Chawla, N. (2020). AI, IOT and Wearable Technology for      Smart Healthcare – A Review. International Journal of      Recent Research Aspects, 7(1), 9–13.
  •       Hebda, T. L., Czar, P., & Hunter, K. (2018). Handbook of Informatics for Nurses & Healthcare      Professionals (6th ed.). Pearson Education (US). https://ambassadored.vitalsource.com/books/9780134748436

DISCUSSION 2

Each healthcare organization has its own internal policies related to how data is managed. There are also federal guidelines and regulations regarding the use of patient data. The data harvested by healthcare organizations is no longer uniquely derived from HIT systems. Wearable technologies have emerged in the market. Mega companies like Apple and Samsung, have also teamed up with some telehealth platforms to connect doctors, institutions, and insurance companies.

Evaluate the impact of data derived from wearable technology on healthcare technology.

Include the following aspects in the discussion:

  • Select Apple’s Health Kit or      another consumer platform of your choice.
  • Discuss how the consumer wearable market is changing the      healthcare delivery process.
  • Summarize why cybersecurity continues to be a major obstacle      to consumer wearable adoption specifically in the H.I.T. space.
  • Discuss your personal perspective on how the lack of ethnic      diversity in data collection impacts the future of healthcare research.

REPLY TO 2 OF MY CLASSMATES DISCUSSION TO THE ABOVE QUESTIONS AND EXPLAIN WHY YOU AGREE. MINIMUM OF 150 WORDS EACH

                                              CLASSMATE POST 2

MIT engineers develop stickers that can see inside the body.

          MIT engineers designed an adhesive patch that produces ultrasound images of the body. A stick-on patch that can do an internal ultrasound scan of a person while they go about their everyday lives has been heralded as a breakthrough in medical imaging. The postage stamp-sized wearable patch can take images of blood arteries, the digestive system, and internal organs for up to 48 hours, providing doctors with a more comprehensive view of a patient’s health than standard scans. In laboratory experiments, researchers utilized the patches to observe how people’s hearts changed during exercise, how their stomachs changed as they drank and passed liquids, and how their muscles suffered microdamage during weightlifting. The patches might “revolutionize” medical imaging, according to Prof. Xuanhe Zhao of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who oversaw the study team. This is because current scans are typically done in hospitals and are often very quick, lasting only a few seconds. The bioadhesive ultrasound (or Baus) patch has a variety of small sensors (piezoelectric transducers) that project ultrasonic waves through the skin and into the body. The same components in the patch are used to pick up these waves when they reflect off tissues, blood vessels, and internal organs. Wearable and accessible ultrasound sensors would create numerous future possibilities without the need for a sonographer, including at-home lung imaging for early pneumonia identification and heart imaging during exercise stress

Cybersecurity of Wearable Devices in Healthcare 

               One of the most individualized devices is wearable mobile devices. The market for mobile, wearable medical devices is expanding quickly. The biggest problem at hand right now is data privacy. The privacy concern is increasingly preventing people from utilizing wearable mobile medical touch technology on a large scale. This is due to growing consumer awareness about data privacy. The knowledge that these gadgets might endanger data confidentiality will eventually become a barrier to the market’s growth for these products. Wearable mobile medical devices raise privacy concerns that several parties must consider and regulate carefully. Despite the evident benefits that wearable mobile devices offer their users, privacy protection should not be sacrificed. Users must be sure that their data will be securely stored and won’t be transmitted or revealed. Wearable mobile medical device manufacturers must take all reasonable precautions to protect users’ privacy. To reduce the dangers of privacy violations within the context of regulatory compliance, the legislature must hasten developing legislation to control the use of wearable mobile medical devices for both personal and corporate objectives.

Race and Ethnicity in Biomedical Research. 

            Biomedical research benefits from a thorough and organized gathering of race and ethnic data in several ways. Ethnicity is a product of self-identification and may not necessarily meet the current mainstream research categories. Additionally, self-identified ethnic groups do not always correspond to official ethnic groups. For instance, a study comparing self-reported data from 13,538 patients with population-based cancer registry data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database found that although the data agreed on race, there was only moderate agreement on Hispanic ethnicity and poor agreement on immigrant status. Researching health outcomes and health status according to race and ethnicity highlights disparities in healthcare and identifies obstacles to accessing proper treatment. Understanding group-associated hazards (such as environmental risk factors) for certain diseases and developing tailored therapies to lower them are also crucial. A more accurate racial and ethnic classification encourages the inclusion of historically underrepresented groups in research and draws attention to understudied communities. Research may be made more inclusive and applicable to our various communities by examining the significant impact that race and ethnicity play in how people experience their daily lives. This will help us better understand the particular health concerns that different groups face. It also aids in determining where money and other resources should be spent.

Dame Idossa.et al.,( 2018). Commentary: Race and Ethnicity in Biomedical Research- Classifications. Challenges and Future Directions.

                           Ethnicity & Disease, vol 28.

Jennifer Chu. MIT News July 28.2022. https://news.mit.edu/2022/ultrasound-stickers-0728and

Minbaleev A.V. et al., (2020). Legal Enforcement of Cybersecurity of Wearable Mobile Devices in Healthcare. Advances in Economics, Business, and

                           Management on Digital economy. Vol.156.